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ben turkia faouzi
  Guest  
  Subject: magnesium production from seawater 


i am intersting to know any available process producing Magnesium
using the seawater through electrolysis device,avoiding the high
cost of energy.


besrt regards
 07-Sep-2003 21:40   Quote 
Roman Deshko
  Guest  

There is no way to extract Mg from seawater directly by electrolysis. But there is a way to produce a suitable feed for electrolytic reduction.

You are welcome to contact me directly if yuo need more...
 09-Sep-2003 18:26   Quote 
walter k mccarter
  Guest  

I am in dire need for several tons of AZ-61 or AZ-31b magnesium alloy in strip or sheet form. Can you direct me to a source for this material?
 10-Sep-2003 02:40   Quote 
Conor Kenny
  Guest  

In reply to Ben Turkia

Ben,

Dow used a sea water process in Freeport Texas (up to 1998) . This this consisted of adding calcined dolomite to sewater to produce magnesium hydroxide whic was then filtered and reacted with Hydrochloric acid. The magnesium chloride produced was further purified then dehydrated to MgCL2. x 1.5-2 H20. The partially dehydrate magnesium chloride was then electrolysed.
Magnesium International in Austrailia hope tu build a plant using thie same dehydration and electrolysis technology.

The process does use large amounts of energy (Electrolysis alone approx 18 kWhe/kg magnesium,).


Another potential magnesium route would be to add slaked lime to
sea water (or better yet desalination concentrated brine) to produce magnesium hydroxide . Then roast to form magnesium oxide
Magnesium oxide (magnesia low tech process widely used good web page on http://www.psi-net.org/chemistry/s2/magnesiumoxide.pdf) . The Magnesium oxide could then be thermally reduced with Ferrosillicon using the Pidgeon process. The principal energy source could now be thermal, coal or natural gas. The magnesium plant could be located next to a large middle east desalination plant , recent plants tend to have gas fired power stations adajacent to the sites. The cost of natual gas in the middle east can be very low (I believe the Saudi price to the fertilliser industry is as low as $0.75/GJ)

My particular area is water and desalination, but I have recently become interested in magnesium out of curiousity and a suspicion that magnesium usage will explode now that:
a) prices are very similar to aluminium,
b) and that the chinese are developing their own car industry (particularily with volkswagen).
c) Dow stranglehold is gone
d) Tarriffs into Europe removed
e) Tarrifs into US maintained by only one company (is that sustainable ? if GM and Ford feel threatened by lighter and cheaper rivals from Japan and eventually China )

Regards
Conor Kenny
 12-Sep-2003 20:33   Quote 
ylf
  Guest  

>In reply to Ben Turkia

>

>Ben,

>

>Dow used a sea water process in Freeport Texas (up to

>1998) . This this consisted of adding calcined dolomite

>to sewater to produce magnesium hydroxide whic was then

>filtered and reacted with Hydrochloric acid. The

>magnesium chloride produced was further purified then

>dehydrated to MgCL2. x 1.5-2 H20. The partially dehydrate

>magnesium chloride was then electrolysed.

>Magnesium International in Austrailia hope tu build a

>plant using thie same dehydration and electrolysis technology.

>

>The process does use large amounts of energy (Electrolysis

>alone approx 18 kWhe/kg magnesium,).

>

>

>Another potential magnesium route would be to add slaked

>lime to

>sea water (or better yet desalination concentrated brine)

>to produce magnesium hydroxide . Then roast to form

>magnesium oxide

>Magnesium oxide (magnesia low tech process widely used

>good web page on

>http://www.psi-net.org/chemistry/s2/magnesiumoxide.pdf) .

>The Magnesium oxide could then be thermally reduced with

>Ferrosillicon using the Pidgeon process. The principal

>energy source could now be thermal, coal or natural gas.

> The magnesium plant could be located next to a large

>middle east desalination plant , recent plants tend to

>have gas fired power stations adajacent to the sites. The

>cost of natual gas in the middle east can be very low (I

>believe the Saudi price to the fertilliser industry is as low as $0.75/GJ)

>

>My particular area is water and desalination, but I have

>recently become interested in magnesium out of curiousity

>and a suspicion that magnesium usage will explode now that:

>a) prices are very similar to aluminium,

>b) and that the chinese are developing their own car

>industry (particularily with volkswagen).

>c) Dow stranglehold is gone

>d) Tarriffs into Europe removed

>e) Tarrifs into US maintained by only one company (is that

>sustainable ? if GM and Ford feel threatened by lighter

>and cheaper rivals from Japan and eventually China )

>

>Regards

>Conor Kenny

 21-Nov-2003 04:58   Quote 
Bob Brown
  Guest  

Conor..
Unfortunately, magnesium oxide can not be reduced easily by ferrosilicon. Magnesium oxide can be reduced by aluminum.

Calcined dolomite (MgO.CaO) is reduced by Ferrosilicon. This can be produced artificially from magnesium oxide and calcined lime (CaO) such as UBE did in Japan in their silicothermic reduction plant in the period after 1965.
 28-Nov-2003 09:35   Quote 
Conor Kenny
  Guest  

Thank you Bob ,

For adding the CaO to Magnesium Oxide for the Pidgeon process as done by UBE.


It is interesting to note that the Timminico plant in Canada has announced that it is to shut down their Pigeon process Magnesium plant. This might make this plant available for relocation (at much reduced capital cost) to a middle east thermal desalination plant. If a local source of of Limestone is available
(or if cheap to import for Turkey or India) , then cheap natural gas could be used to convert the limestone to CaO. Some of the CaO then slaked and used to produce Magnesium Hydroxide , the Magnesium hydroxide would be then Roasted to form MgO (fuel again cheap natural gas). The MgO would be then combined with more CaO and converted to Magnesium metal in the relocated pidgeon process (again using natural gas as a fuel).

The above would have several benefits

a) Very low energy costs as natural gas at $0.75-$1 /GJ being used.

b) Pidgeon process is a relatively Low Capital cost process which could be even lower in capital cost as a plant redudant in Canada
could be moved to the Mid East.

c) Outfalls already used for waste desaliantion brine thus no extra needed for the lime production

d) Low labour cost for low skill labour

e) Share skilled labour with the desalination plant

f) What low electrical power is required would be available from the onsite power stations at most desalination facilities

g) Utilising Natural gas to non oil related industries a strategic goal for many gas rich Mid East countries

h) Distance closer to the european magnesium Market than Australia or China.


Regards
Conor Kenny
 20-Jan-2004 14:50   Quote 
Bob Brown
  Guest  

Conor:
There is probably little in the plant at Timminco that could be worth moving. The Chinese can build a 3000 ton per year silicothermic plant for about US$1 million. The most high priced components are the vacuum system and the retorts. I think that you could hire a Chinese group to design and build a silicothermic plant and they could do it quite fast and quite cheap. In China, they use a lot of coal to fire the furnaces, the calcining units, and even the melting pots. With low cost natural gas, you could improve the productivity of the process.

There is also the Danish group MTL that has patented a carbothermic process and can produce magnesium from MgO using carbon and a high temperature. There is also another group that is reported to be working on a new retort for the silicothermic process which will be more efficient because of a change in the method of heating.
 21-Jan-2004 09:58   Quote 
Bertha Butt


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We need Bill Bradshaw's curtains.
 05-Jun-2004 16:02   Quote 
Meir Gilady


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Could anyone calculate the costs per ton of pure Mg metal produced from MgO.?The best price/ton/cost calculation.
Costs of plant per 3000 ton/year made in China as mentioned here(1 million$), can i get the chinese information?
 27-Jan-2007 12:17   Quote 
shivam pandey


Location:


Posts:
 

can you give me some details of magnesium production.....



>There is no way to extract Mg from seawater directly by

>electrolysis. But there is a way to produce a suitable

>feed for electrolytic reduction.

>

>You are welcome to contact me directly if yuo need more...

 27-Nov-2008 13:30   Quote 
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